KYUK AM

Hunting & Fishing

Stories related to subsistence/commercial/sport hunting, fishing, gathering activities.

Karen Laubenstein / USFWS

Hunters along the lower Kuskokwim River have harvested fewer moose this fall than in recent years. 

Olivia Ebertz / KYUK

This season is shaping up to be the worst fall for salmon fishing on the Yukon River in recorded history. It follows the worst recorded summer salmon season ever.

Olivia Ebertz / KYUK

In Western Alaska, chum salmon stocks have sharply declined over the last two years. That’s a problem, because people in the region depend heavily on the fish for food and for work. Scientists are in the early stages of trying to understand the crash. 

  

Elyssa Loughlin / KYUK

Yukon River summer chum dropped to a record low this summer, down to a tenth of their average run size. Fishing for the species was closed all summer, and fall salmon runs could look similarly dismal. 

Olivia Ebertz / KYUK

For decades, Kwik’Pak Fisheries in Emmonak has provided reliable summer employment in one of the state’s most unemployed regions. The company is the only fish processor on the Yukon River. But with salmon runs low and commercial fishing closed, it’s offering few jobs this summer. Commercial fishermen and women are feeling the economic stress, and those who are still working at the plant have had to transition to new roles. 

  

Olivia Ebertz / KYUK

Usually, Kwik’pak Fisheries, the only commercial fish processor on the Yukon, sells salmon around the world. After the Yukon’s main salmon species started dwindling to record lows last year, Kwik’pak had to pivot to stay afloat. 

  

Olivia Ebertz / KYUK

For eight years, Tanya Ives has been traveling up from Washington each summer to work at the Yukon River’s only fish processing plant: Kwik’Pak Fisheries. The plant sits outside of Emmonak at the river’s mouth. Normally at this time of year, Ives would be packing up chum salmon harvested by commercial fishermen along the Yukon River to sell around the world. But this summer, she’s doing the opposite.


Karen Laubenstein / USFWS

There’ll be a longer moose hunting season this fall in Zone 2 of state Game Management Unit 18.

Salmon are harvested from the Kuskokwim River during a subsistence fishing opening on June 12, 2018.
Katie Basile / KYUK

Kuskokwim River fishermen want information on how commercial bycatch could be affecting Kuskokwim subsistence salmon runs, and they’re asking Gov. Dunleavy for help.

A gillnet soaks in the Kuskokwim River during the opening on June 12, 2018.
Katie Basile / KYUK

The entire Kuskokwim River will open full-time to subsistence fishing with gillnets beginning at 12:01 a.m. on July 31. At that time, gillnet restrictions on the river will be liberalized to include any size mesh, and nets can stretch up to 50 fathoms in length.

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