KYUK AM

Greg Kim

News Reporter

Greg Kim is a news reporter for KYUK. In his past life, he worked as a software engineer in Seattle, WA. He visited Bethel in 2019 for the Kuskokwim 300, and decided he wanted to tell the stories of the people in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta.

Katie Basile / KYUK

During the COVID-19 outbreak, life in the villages poses its own set of challenges. Since some communities are without running water and many people live in overcrowded homes, many state and federal guidelines for how to stay healthy and prevent the spread of coronavirus do not apply. Here are some recommendations that the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation has tailored for Y-K Delta village residents:

On March 25, Bethel City Council adopted its second emergency ordinance in as many days.
City of Bethel

Bethel City Council awarded $37,199 in Community Action Grants to local organizations on March 24, but is holding off on signing the checks. Due to canceled and postponed events during the coronavirus pandemic, the city will be asking grant recipients to see if they still need the money. 

Hooper Bay Tribal Administrator Mamie Tinker says that RavnAir and Grant Aviation have complied with the village's request to keep "outsiders" from entering the community.
Katie Basile / KYUK

The number of villages in the Y-K Delta that are enacting travel restrictions in order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus has been growing by the day. KYUK knows of over 20 villages that are telling their residents not to leave and outsiders not to enter, but how are these villages enforcing those restrictions? Three Y-K Delta villages shared three different approaches.


A home in Lower Kalskag was newly connected with running water in the fall of 2019.
Greg Kim / KYUK

Many more people in Y-K Delta villages will soon have access to running water to wash their hands during the coronavirus outbreak. On March 24, the Alaska Rural Utility Collaborative (ARUC)’s advisory committee voted to reconnect running water to homes that were unable to pay for it. 


On March 25, Bethel City Council adopted its second emergency ordinance in as many days.
City of Bethel

Bethel has officially declared a local emergency disaster. In an emergency meeting on March 25, Bethel City Council unanimously adopted the emergency ordinance. Aside from requesting funding from the state and federal governments, it issued strong health recommendations to Bethel residents. City administration explained what those recommendations are and how the city plans to enforce them.




On March 25, Bethel City Council adopted its second emergency ordinance in as many days.
City of Bethel

The City of Bethel has responded to the public’s demands that it take strong action against the coronavirus threat. In their meeting on Tuesday, March 24, Bethel City Council passed its first emergency ordinance in response to COVID-19. Council will meet in an emergency meeting on Wednesday, March 25 at 2 p.m. to consider adopting a declaration of local disaster emergency. Mayor Perry Barr and Acting City Manager Bill Howell already signed the declaration Tuesday, which kick-started the process.

An Alaska Cab driver waiting for a rider in May 2007.
Al Grillo / Associated Press

Alaska Cab is still transporting customers around Bethel as of Tuesday, March 24. Bethel's largest taxi company, Kusko Cab, halted all of its vehicles on March 20 due to the threat of COVID-19.

On March 25, Bethel City Council adopted its second emergency ordinance in as many days.
City of Bethel

On March 24, the Bethel City Council will consider adopting an emergency ordinance in response to the coronavirus threat. This emergency ordinance will allow the council to meet telephonically, and allows the city manager to cancel or postpone meetings and modify personnel leave time in the interest of public health. The emergency ordinance does not enact any travel restrictions or mandates for residents to stay at home. 

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