KYUK AM

Johanna Eurich

Managing Editor

Johanna Eurich's vivid broadcast productions have been widely heard on National Public Radio since 1978. She spent her childhood speaking Thai, then learned English as a teenager and was educated at a dance academy, boarding schools and with leading intellectuals at her grandparents' dinner table in Philadelphia.

Eurich learned broadcasting in 1974 and helped advocate for the work of independent radio producers and stations. She moved to Alaska to be News Director of KSKA in Anchorage after helping put WVMR on the air - a solar heated radio station in one of the poorest parts of Appalachia. 

She has worked for the Alaska Public Radio Network, KTNA in Talkeetna, KDLG in Dillingham, as well as periods at KCUK, in Chevak and KBRW in Barrow. She was at KYUK in 1996 and returned as Managing Editor in 2016.

Petra Harpak / KYUK

The four seasons mean different activities in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. In winter, spring, summer and fall, subsistence users collect a variety of foods. Right now, hunters and berry pickers are hard at work. 

Petra Harpak / KYUK

Fall means hunting and berry picking on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. KYUK’s Petra Harpak talked to Esther Green, one of the oldest ladies out picking on the tundra.

Karen Laubenstein / USFWS

An Emergency Order issued by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game on Wednesday shuts down the resident moose hunt in Zone 1 of Unit 18 at 11:59 p.m. on Friday, September 7.  Managers expect the harvest quota of 170 bull moose will be reached by that time.

Petra Harpak / KYUK

Gladys Jung fifth graders interview Bethel's elder, Peter Atchak about elder knowledge of climate change.


Katie Basile / KYUK

Scientist, Janessa Esquible talks with Bethel fifth graders about her experience as a scientist.


Last spring, a team of intrepid fifth graders at Gladys Jung Elementary School explored the impact that climate change could have on their communities.
Christine Trudeau/KYUK

Last spring, an intrepid team of fifth graders at Gladys Jung Elementary School explored the impact that climate change could have on their communities. With a little help from KYUK, a group of gumshoe reporters from Erin Arno’s fifth grade class interviewed an Elder and a Western-trained scientist about the changes they had observed.


Enough kings made it into the Yukon River to meet the predicted minimum this season. Now that most of the kings are headed well up the waterway, the data indicates that the run, after struggling, came in at 74,000. This is just above the minimum preseason prediction of 71,000. There were fewer older fish than predicted with the 5 to 7-year fish numbers low, but the proportion of 4 to 6-year kings were above average. The proportion of females in the run was well above average at 51 percent.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game

Fewer summer chum and king salmon swam up the Yukon River than expected this season, although high water and debris made it tough to catch and count the salmon swimming by. 

Commercial fishing for chum salmon continues this week on the Yukon River. The opening in District 1 closed today, June 19, but will open back up 12 hours later for more commercial dipnet fishing. The opening in District 1 will begin at one minute after midnight on Wednesday and run for 58 hours until it closes at 10 a.m. on Friday. 

Eighteen packs of canned beer line the shelves at the opening of BNC's liquor store, Bethel Spirits, on Sept. 27, 2016.
Dean Swope/KYUK

Bethel’s alcohol issues are a substantial part of the Alaska Alcohol Beverage Control Board’s agenda when it meets in Nome on Tuesday. The Board intends to review a listening session that was held by state officials in Bethel last month.

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