KYUK AM

Johanna Eurich

Managing Editor

Johanna Eurich's vivid broadcast productions have been widely heard on National Public Radio since 1978. She spent her childhood speaking Thai, then learned English as a teenager and was educated at a dance academy, boarding schools and with leading intellectuals at her grandparents' dinner table in Philadelphia.

Eurich learned broadcasting in 1974 and helped advocate for the work of independent radio producers and stations. She moved to Alaska to be News Director of KSKA in Anchorage after helping put WVMR on the air - a solar heated radio station in one of the poorest parts of Appalachia. 

She has worked for the Alaska Public Radio Network, KTNA in Talkeetna, KDLG in Dillingham, as well as periods at KCUK, in Chevak and KBRW in Barrow. She was at KYUK in 1996 and returned as Managing Editor in 2016.

Courtesy of Aassanaaq Kairaiuak

Gabby Hiestand-Salgado, a Jesuit Volunteer working at KYUK, came up with the idea of making a film of people dancing to the same Yup’ik song from wherever they were hunkering down during the pandemic. The two Blanchett brothers, Phillip and Steven, and their band, Pamyua, were quick to help.


Teresa Cotsirilos / KYUK

The packets are on their way to Calista Corporation shareholders. Calista Director of Communications Thom Leonard says that information for the annual meeting in July will go in the mail Friday, May 22, and arrive in electronic mailboxes that afternoon.


YKHC Nurse Kerry Cobbledick hands out swabs at a station set up for coronavirus testing outside of the Alaska Airlines airport terminal in Bethel, Alaska on April 28, 2020.
Katie Basile / KYUK

Health officials sprang into action Friday when the second case of COVID-19 was discovered by the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation through its airport testing, offered free to those flying into Bethel. This was the first case in a village.

 

 


Tatyana Avugiak of Chefornak and Kaylee King of Mekoryuk are KYUK interns, and will be high school seniors starting in the fall of 2020.
Courtesy of Tatyana Avugiak and Kaylee King

Doing schoolwork at home is tough, especially in rural villages where internet is limited and access to teachers requires a phone call. But that that’s what many students have been forced to do during the coronavirus pandemic.


Salmon drying on a Kuskokwim fish rack.
Shane Iverson / KYUK

It takes more than a pandemic to stop fishing. The salmon are on the way, and fishermen will be out on the Kuskokwim River this summer. With them will be biologists and harvest monitors. Orutsararmiut Native Council biologists and staff, among others, are getting ready to survey the salmon catch.

KYUK Interns Tatyana Avugiak and Kaylee King connect with friends, teachers, and KYUK virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Courtesy of Tatyana Avugiak and Kaylee King

As spring arrives, people are beginning to relax on social distancing protocols as they prepare to fish and gather subsistence foods in some villages.


Amy Davis

Acting Bethel Police Chief Amy Davis is leaving her job and leaving town, but she said that she will stay until the city hires a replacement. She wants to help the new police chief get started before she moves on.

Salmon caught during a rare gillnet opening on the Kuskokwim River on June 24, 2017.
Teresa Cotsirilos / KYUK

Management of the Yukon River summer salmon season is in flux. Some of that is normal. No one ever knows whether the fish will show up in the numbers predicted. But there is a new factor. This year, the state and the river communities are looking at how best to monitor salmon, while at the same time keeping local people safe from the coronavirus pandemic. 


The pool at the Yukon-Kuskokwim Fitness Center in Bethel.
Dean Swope/KYUK

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Fitness Center reopened on May 9, with a set of new rules to protect the staff and patrons. About 50 people showed up the first weekend. Stacey Reardon is the center’s facility director. She and staff have developed rules that they hope will keep people safe while not being overly restrictive.


Katie Basile

There will be commercial chum salmon fishing in the Yukon River this year. KwikPak is going to buy and process fish this summer for its Emmonak plant. But this year, the operation will have a whole lot less interaction with the community. 


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