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Politics

Stories about politics.

Alaska state Sen. Donny Olson (left) and Sen. Lyman Hoffman (right)
Alaska State Legislature

Two rural Alaska state senators want to make sure that every Alaskan has access to a ballot on Election Day in November. Democratic Sens. Lyman Hoffman and Donny Olson are calling on the Alaska Division of Elections to create a plan ensuring that every eligible Alaskan will get a ballot in their community.

City of Bethel

Unofficial election results show a new face joining Bethel City Council. Rose “Sugar” Henderson will fill former council member Hugh Dyment’s seat. Mayor Perry Barr and council member Michelle DeWitt will return for two more years. 

Voters cast ballots in the Bethel City Elections at the Bethel Cultural Center on Oct. 4, 2016.
Katie Basile / KYUK

If passed, the Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting and Campaign Finance Laws Initiative, or Ballot Measure 2, would change the way that Alaskans vote in both the primary and general elections. It would do away with Alaska's current partisan primary, allowing Alaskans to vote for any candidate in the primary, regardless of party affiliation. 

In the upcoming general election in November, Alaskans will vote on two ballot measures. One of these is the Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting and Campaign Finance Laws Initiative, also known as Ballot Measure 2, and we’ll hear from people on both sides of the measure. We’ve already talked to the supporters, so today we’re talking with Brett Huber with the group Defend Alaska Elections, which opposes Ballot Measure 2.


In the upcoming general election, Alaskans will vote on two ballot measures. One of these is called the Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting and Campaign Finance Laws Initiative, also known as Ballot Measure 2, and we’ll hear from people on both sides of the measure. First we’ll start with the supporters Robert Dillon, who’s with the group Alaskans for Better Elections, and Joy Huntington, who’s Koyukon Athabscan and the founder and president of Uqaqti Consulting. Huntington is also a consultant for the campaign.


Bill Roth / ADN

Alaska's Ballot Measure 1 would change the state’s oil taxes to increase the amount that oil companies pay, and reduce the deductions that they can take, among other things. Opponents say that it will hurt the industry and that’s not good for Alaska. Chantal Walsh is the campaign manager for One Alaska, a group opposing the measure. 

Katie Basile / KYUK

A mistake prevented residents of a Y-K Delta community from being able to vote in Alaska's primary election. The Alaska Division of Elections said that it didn’t know people were living in Mertarvik until a week before the election. About 130 people have been living there for the past year. On top of that, Newtok never received supplies for its election, resulting in only 17 people there voting in the primary.

 


Bill Ferguson exits a voting booth at the Yupiit Piciryarait Cultural Center, one of two available precincts in Bethel, Alaska on November 8, 2016.
Katie Basile / KYUK

Read this post to learn all you need to know about the Bethel City Elections.

Willy Keppel

One of the candidates for State House District 38 is facing a $21,625 fine for not disclosing his campaign finances on time. Willy Keppel, from Quinhagak, blames his failure to submit those reports on poor internet service in rural Alaska. 

Courtesy of the U.S. Census Bureau

Rural Alaska has been doing well on filling out the census, but the problem is in hub communities like Bethel. According to Nicole Borromeo, executive vice president and general counsel for the Alaska Federation of Natives, that failure to provide census data will cost the region lots of money.

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