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Economy

Stories about the local, state, or national economy.

Dean Swope / KYUK

This year, Orutsararmiut Native Council is broadening its services for Elders and tackling potential elder abuse. 

Col. Wayne Don Presses Judge To Decide Calista Lawsuit

Jan 3, 2019
Col. Wayne Don

The Calista Native Regional Corporation’s internal board battle ended up in court when it filed suit against its former board chairman, Col. Wayne Don. The case still has not gone to trial, but the nature of the suit has changed significantly. 

Calista originally filed suit against three people, but is now down to just one defendant: Col. Wayne Don. The pre-trial maneuvers now include a countersuit, and a request for the judge to decide the case.

Anna Rose MacArthur / KYUK

Anchorage’s recreational marijuana shop, ALASKAbuds, is inching closer to its first expansion in Bethel. On January 10, ALASKAbuds owner Nick Miller will go before Bethel’s planning commission, which will decide whether or not to approve the store’s conditional use permit. 


Calista Payout Hits New Mark

Jan 2, 2019
Calista Corporation

Calista shareholders got larger dividends in 2018. According to a report released by the Native Regional corporation, payouts to members in Calista’s three dividend programs totaled a little over $9.5 million, up from around $9 million paid out the year before. 

Calista has three different dividend programs, with the largest dividend distribution in the spring. Calista Communications Manager Thom Leonard says that generally, Native corporations like Calista provide much higher dividends than conventional corporations listed on stock exchanges.

Courtesy of ONC

Going forward into the new year, organizations like Orutsararmiut Native Council are plotting out what they plan to accomplish. KYUK's Krysti Shallenberger sat down with ONC Executive Director Peter Evon to talk about what he saw as the organization’s biggest accomplishments in 2018, and ONC's goals for 2019. The following is a condensed and edited interview.


Another Lawsuit Filed In The Calista Board Battle

Dec 24, 2018
Wayne Don

The Calista Corporation is calling it a frivolous lawsuit, but for Col. Wayne Don, it’s a way to cover legal expenses and keep shareholders from paying for an ongoing board battle that has ended up in the courts.

Last spring, the Calista Regional Native Corporation filed a lawsuit against its own former board chairman and current board member Col. Wayne Don. It has not yet gone to trial, but a countersuit has now been filed.

CVRF Gives Bonuses For Youth

Dec 21, 2018

There's a holiday bonus in store for youth who go to work helping their villages. A $100 or more bonus is what the 640 youth in the Coastal Villages Region Fund’s "Youth to Work" program can look forward to this Christmas season.

CVRF's board of directors set aside $100,000 for the bonuses. Michelle Humphry, CVRF’s community outreach director, says that the group has been working hard, and the board wanted to acknowledge that.

Dean Swope / KYUK

The Bethel Planning Commission approved the Blue Sky Estates Subdivision last week. It's a project that Lyman Hoffman has been working for almost a decade to develop.

“There’s been a crying need in Bethel area for new housing,” said Hoffman. “It’s a positive move, I think, for Bethel and the citizens to see the City of Bethel to continue to grow.” 

Winter Dividends From Calista

Dec 11, 2018

This year, there are more happy Calista shareholders than ever as the holiday season begins.  

“We’re getting a lot of very positive comments,” said shareholder and Calista Communications Manager Thom Leonard.

Leonard says that the number of people receiving corporation dividends this year is more than twice as high as last year. The reason? A decision shareholders made to open enrollment to people who had not been born before 1971, when enrollment closed originally, and also to people who failed to enroll by that deadline.

Courtesy of Alaska Center For Climate Assessment And Policy

Alaska is warming twice as fast as the rest of the U.S., and the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta is seeing the impacts faster than than most of the state. 


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