KYUK AM

Krysti Shallenberger, Alaska’s Energy Desk

Reporter

Krysti Shallenberger reports on climate, energy and natural resources development for KYUK. She travels to Alaska by way of Washington D.C., where she was an editor at Utility Dive, a trade publication, and a reporting fellow at E&E News. Krysti also reported in Wyoming, Montana and Alabama. She holds a master's in journalism from the University of Montana, focusing on natural resource and environmental issues.

Courtesy of Google Maps

The Alaska State Troopers arrested a man in Akiachak for sexually abusing a minor on June 27.

Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News

U.S. Attorney General William Barr declared a law enforcement emergency in Alaska on June 28. The announcement follows a visit to the state where he saw firsthand how many rural communities have little to no public safety.  


Krysti Shallenberger / KYUK

In Western Alaska, accelerating erosion is forcing several villages to consider moving. In Quinhagak, a village on the Bering Sea, erosion is threatening the sewer lagoon and the building that houses its washeteria and health clinic. 


Christine Trudeau / KYUK

On Thursday, the Bethel Planning Commission approved a conditional use permit for a liquor store that the Alaska Commercial Company wants to build.

Krysti Shallenberger / KYUK

Napakiak applied for a permit from the Army Corps of Engineers to help repair its eroding boat landing; spring storms wiped out most of it this year. Now barges, boats, and hovercraft don’t have a place to park.

Katie Basile / KYUK

10:00 a.m. The reported tundra fire off Bethel’s Wildlife Lane on Thursday morning turned out not to be a tundra fire at all. Instead, Bethel firefighters extinguished a burning pickup truck and bicycle in the Old Crow sandpit. The flames did not spread beyond the vehicle.

Krysti Shallenberger / KYUK

When most people think of sport fishing in Alaska, they think of Homer, Bristol Bay, or the Kenai River. They don’t think of Quinhagak, a small remote village near the Kuskokwim Bay in Southwest Alaska. But people from all over the world come to Quinhagak, lured in by its vast selection of salmon and trout. 


Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News

Last week, U.S. Attorney General William Barr spent three days touring Alaska with the congressional delegation to hear about and see for himself the lack of public safety in rural Alaska. He spent a day in Bethel and the nearby village of Napaskiak. 


Katie Basile / KYUK

The May smelt run on the Kuskokwim river heralds the arrival of king salmon and other traditional subsistence foods. There had been almost no studies on the small fish until Donlin Gold proposed building one of the biggest gold mines in the world in the Y-K Delta. The company says that the data they’re collecting will help determine how future barge traffic from the mine will impact the smelts, but residents who oppose the mine say that the study isn’t enough.  


U.S. Attorney General William Barr heard concerns from Alaska Native leaders about the lack of law enforcement and high rates of sexual assault and domestic violence in rural Alaska.
Joey Mendolia / Alaska Public Media

U.S. Attorney General William Barr is in Bethel and Napaskiak today, May 31. The visit continues his Alaska tour, meeting with public officials and Alaska Native leaders to discuss public safety, the lack of law enforcement in rural communities, and how the federal government can help.

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