KYUK AM

Krysti Shallenberger, Alaska’s Energy Desk

Reporter

Krysti Shallenberger reports on climate, energy and natural resources development for KYUK. She travels to Alaska by way of Washington D.C., where she was an editor at Utility Dive, a trade publication, and a reporting fellow at E&E News. Krysti also reported in Wyoming, Montana and Alabama. She holds a master's in journalism from the University of Montana, focusing on natural resource and environmental issues.

The proposed Donlin Gold mine site in 2014. The site is located north of Crooked Creek, which sits on the Kuskokwim River in Alaska.
Dean Swope / KYUK

On April 12, an administrative law judge issued a recommendation that the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation rescind a state water quality certificate that was issued to the Donlin Gold mine in 2018. The certificate is required under the Clean Water Act. Here's what rescinding the certificate could mean for the proposed mine, and how the parties involved in the decision have responded to the judge’s recommendation.

The proposed Donlin Gold mine site in 2014. The site is located north of Crooked Creek, which sits on the Kuskokwim River in Alaska.
Dean Swope / KYUK

The Alaska Department of Natural Resources gave the public 15 days to comment on 12 water right permits for the proposed Donlin Gold mine in December. The Orutsararmiut Native Council claims that wasn’t enough time, especially as villages locked down to slow the spread of the coronavirus, and taking into account limited access to the internet in rural Alaska.

Voters cast ballots in the Bethel City Elections at the Bethel Cultural Center on Oct. 4, 2016.
Katie Basile / KYUK

If passed, the Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting and Campaign Finance Laws Initiative, or Ballot Measure 2, would change the way that Alaskans vote in both the primary and general elections. It would do away with Alaska's current partisan primary, allowing Alaskans to vote for any candidate in the primary, regardless of party affiliation. 

In the upcoming general election in November, Alaskans will vote on two ballot measures. One of these is the Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting and Campaign Finance Laws Initiative, also known as Ballot Measure 2, and we’ll hear from people on both sides of the measure. We’ve already talked to the supporters, so today we’re talking with Brett Huber with the group Defend Alaska Elections, which opposes Ballot Measure 2.


In the upcoming general election, Alaskans will vote on two ballot measures. One of these is called the Top-Four Ranked-Choice Voting and Campaign Finance Laws Initiative, also known as Ballot Measure 2, and we’ll hear from people on both sides of the measure. First we’ll start with the supporters Robert Dillon, who’s with the group Alaskans for Better Elections, and Joy Huntington, who’s Koyukon Athabscan and the founder and president of Uqaqti Consulting. Huntington is also a consultant for the campaign.


Bill Roth / ADN

Alaska's Ballot Measure 1 would change the state’s oil taxes to increase the amount that oil companies pay, and reduce the deductions that they can take, among other things. Opponents say that it will hurt the industry and that’s not good for Alaska. Chantal Walsh is the campaign manager for One Alaska, a group opposing the measure. 

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation COVID-19 testing tent is located in the YKHC Administrative Building parking lot.
Dean Swope/KYUK

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation is offering free flu shots across the region this Saturday, Oct. 3.

Yukon summer chum salmon with a radiotag.
ADF&G

Mushers on the Yukon River are struggling to feed their dogs because of weak king and chum salmon runs this year.

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