KYUK AM

Johanna Eurich

Managing Editor

Johanna Eurich's vivid broadcast productions have been widely heard on National Public Radio since 1978. She spent her childhood speaking Thai, then learned English as a teenager and was educated at a dance academy, boarding schools and with leading intellectuals at her grandparents' dinner table in Philadelphia.

Eurich learned broadcasting in 1974 and helped advocate for the work of independent radio producers and stations. She moved to Alaska to be News Director of KSKA in Anchorage after helping put WVMR on the air - a solar heated radio station in one of the poorest parts of Appalachia. 

She has worked for the Alaska Public Radio Network, KTNA in Talkeetna, KDLG in Dillingham, as well as periods at KCUK, in Chevak and KBRW in Barrow. She was at KYUK in 1996 and returned as Managing Editor in 2016.

Kwik'Pak Fisheries in Emmonak, Alaska on July 15, 2019.
Anna Rose MacArthur / KYUK

A positive COVID-19 case in Mountain Village has shut down commercial fishing in that community. Kwik’pak, a plant that processes Yukon River salmon, has stopped purchasing fish in Y2, or District 2 of the Yukon River, which includes Mountain Village, Pitkas Point, St. Mary’s, Pilot Station, and Marshall.

City of Bethel

Bethel’s Fourth of July Parade, themed "United We Stand," will go to great lengths this year to protect people from crowding and the potential spread of coronavirus. The event will be an extended motorized tour of almost every neighborhood in town, stretching from Tundra Ridge to Blueberry Subdivision.

Katie Basile

The chums are beginning to swim up the Yukon River. They are even later than last year’s run, which was the latest run biologists had ever seen.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game manager Holly Carroll says that the subsistence fishing openings are designed to target chums using dip nets and beach seines, and let all kings swim on to spawn.

After over a year at the organization, ONC Executive Director Ron Hoffman has decided to resign.
KYUK Staff

Bethel’s tribe, Orutsararmiut Native Council, has received a huge amount of money to deal with COVID-19’s impact on the community. ONC Executive Director Mark Springer says that the organization got $13.8 million in Federal CARES Act funding.  

Children orphaned by the flu epidemic at Pawik (Naknek), Alaska in 1919.
NAU.PH.568.4362: Northern Arizona University, Cline Library [Emery Kolb Collection]

The merciless force of a pandemic is nothing new to Southwest Alaska. Many people in the region have grown up with stories of the 1918 flu epidemic killing whole villages. KYUK’s Julia Jimmie heard those tales from her mother and aunt, who heard them from their parents, some of whom were there when death came to visit.


Krysti Shallenberger / KYUK

Patience may be required this summer to navigate Bethel’s Chief Eddie Hoffman Highway. Knik Construction Superintendent Bob McDonald said that delays from highway work could be four to five minutes in some places, starting in late June.  

Kuskokwim king salmon.
Katie Basile / KYUK

Salmon are beginning to swim up the river, and many people are watching to see what kind of run there will be on the Kuskokwim this year.

Courtesy of Aassanaaq Kairaiuak

Gabby Hiestand-Salgado, a Jesuit Volunteer working at KYUK, came up with the idea of making a film of people dancing to the same Yup’ik song from wherever they were hunkering down during the pandemic. The two Blanchett brothers, Phillip and Steven, and their band, Pamyua, were quick to help.


Teresa Cotsirilos / KYUK

The packets are on their way to Calista Corporation shareholders. Calista Director of Communications Thom Leonard says that information for the annual meeting in July will go in the mail Friday, May 22, and arrive in electronic mailboxes that afternoon.


YKHC Nurse Kerry Cobbledick hands out swabs at a station set up for coronavirus testing outside of the Alaska Airlines airport terminal in Bethel, Alaska.
Katie Basile / KYUK

Health officials sprang into action Friday when the second case of COVID-19 was discovered by the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation through its airport testing, offered free to those flying into Bethel. This was the first case in a village.

 

 


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