KYUK AM

Johanna Eurich

Managing Editor

Johanna Eurich's vivid broadcast productions have been widely heard on National Public Radio since 1978. She spent her childhood speaking Thai, then learned English as a teenager and was educated at a dance academy, boarding schools and with leading intellectuals at her grandparents' dinner table in Philadelphia.

Eurich learned broadcasting in 1974 and helped advocate for the work of independent radio producers and stations. She moved to Alaska to be News Director of KSKA in Anchorage after helping put WVMR on the air - a solar heated radio station in one of the poorest parts of Appalachia. 

She has worked for the Alaska Public Radio Network, KTNA in Talkeetna, KDLG in Dillingham, as well as periods at KCUK, in Chevak and KBRW in Barrow. She was at KYUK in 1996 and returned as Managing Editor in 2016.

Katie Basile / KYUK

Attempts to create a regional tribal government for the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta appear to be picking up steam. The Calista regional corporation, working with consultants, now has a process in place for each of the 56 tribes in the region to signal their intent to vote on the creation of a regional government.

Nunapitchuk declared a lockdown on May 15 after a traveler to the village tested positive for COVID-19. The lockdown comes a week after the community experienced its worst flooding in a decade, pictured here on May 8, 2020.
JACOB TOBELUK

Nunapitchuk is a village that managed to eliminate COVID-19 after it had spread within the community, and they did it using a combination of traditional medicine and strong lockdown protocols.

Nunaptichuk City Council Member Thomas Parks is our guest this morning on Coffee at KYUK. He shares how Nunapitchuk had a COVID-19 surge and managed to stop it. Parks began by telling a story about his family. It centers on the fact that people without symptoms can spread the disease even when they think they are helping. The story begins when his brother was stuck with no money, spending the night at the Anchorage airport while trying to get home to Nunapitchuk. The interview was recorded last week. 


The Lower Kuskokwim School District announced Bethel students would start school remotely on Aug. 24.
Katie Basile / KYUK

School sports appear to be a victim of the latest surge in COVID-19 cases. Lower Kuskokwim School District Superintendent Kimberly Hankins said that as long as schools are at “high-risk” or on lockdown, there are no school sports, and there are limits on other activities as well. Getting sports back depends on controlling the latest surge in positive cases. Communities have a couple of weeks to do it. 

Teresa Cotsirilos / KYUK

There are now two efforts to create a regional tribal government in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. The older effort, Nunavut, led by Mike Williams Sr. has made little progress to unite large numbers of villages in the region. The second effort is being facilitated by the Calista regional Native corporation.

Calista Corporation

It’s is the biggest distribution to shareholders since the regional Native corporation Calista created a settlement trust. 

Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation hospital in Bethel, Alaska
Greg Kim / KYUK

Updated 2 p.m. Oct. 23, 2020

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region is experiencing a huge increase in COVID-19 cases. The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services reported that if the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta were a state, it would have the fourth highest rate of cases in the country. Dr. Ellen Hodges, Chief of Staff at the Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation, said that what is happening in the region is following a pattern set in Alaska’s urban areas.

Tiffany Zulkosky was sworn in as House District 38's state representative on March 9, 2018.
Courtesy of Michelle Sparck.

State Rep. Tiffany Zulkosky said that her biggest accomplishments have been fighting the governor’s budget vetoes to protect rural Alaska, and the creation of the House Special Committee on Tribal Affairs. That committee led the effort to establish November as Alaska Heritage Month. Zulkosky’s concern for rural Alaska's tribes was evident during her first year in office.

Alyse Galvin Campaign

This is the second time that Alyse Galvin will try to defeat Don Young, the longest-serving member of Congress. She said that Young has been there too long, and that he doesn’t have any power because term limits prevent him from chairing any committee, even if the Republicans were to regain control of the House of Representatives.

The opening for federally qualified subsistence users for king salmon will be from 12 p.m. to 12 a.m. on Monday, June 12.
Dave Cannon

A fishing trawl survey in the Bering Sea appears to have documented some fish stock changes caused by the warming climate. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, has been conducting trawl surveys of the northern Bering Sea since 2003. 

Pages