KYUK AM

Anna Rose MacArthur

News Director

Anna Rose MacArthur catching a four-wheeler ride in Napakiak, Alaska.
Credit Katie Basile / KYUK

Anna Rose MacArthur serves as KYUK's News Director. She got her start reporting in Alaska at KNOM in Nome, and then traveled south to report with KRTS in Marfa, Texas. Anna Rose soon missed rural Alaska and returned to join KYUK in 2015. She leads an award-winning newsroom and has launched statewide public radio reporting collaborations. Her journalism has received a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award and statewide awards for coverage on climate change, health, business, education, and mushing. Anna Rose’s favorite stories to tell include a muskox, salmon, or sled dog. Her work has appeared on NPR, 99 Percent Invisible, HowSound, and Transom. She is a Transom Story Workshop alumni and a certified Zumba instructor.

A COVID-19 test sample is collected from the drive-thru test site run by the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation on April 14, 2020 in Bethel, Alaska.
Katie Basile / KYUK

It’s been one week since the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation announced the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in the region. Since then, YKHC has more than doubled its testing. As of April 14, the health corporation had administered over 200 coronavirus tests in the region. All tests, except the one confirmed positive, have come back negative. About 30 test results are still pending.


A fleet of Cessna 207 airplanes owned by Ravn Air Group sits grounded on the tarmac after the airline announced that they were cutting 90 percent of their service on April 2, 2020. They later filed for bankruptcy.
Katie Basile / KYUK

COVID-19 has disrupted air travel in Alaska, and one of the largest airlines serving the bush has abruptly grounded all of its planes. A state task force was called together to look at what to do after Ravn Air Group declared bankruptcy and stopped flying.


A boat rides down a river near Quinhagak.
Krysti Shallenberger / KYUK

Quinhagak community leaders are asking the State of Alaska to close sport fishing in the waterways of the Kuskokwim Bay this summer. The request precedes an appeal from Dillingham city and tribal leaders asking the governor to close Bristol Bay’s commercial salmon fishery.

Aniak, Alaska
Alaska Department of Commerce

As COVID-19 is spreading across Alaska, spring is approaching and the countdown to breakup is beginning. On the Kuskokwim River, that breakup is expected to be more dramatic and more destructive than recent years, with possible flooding from ice jams. The Middle Kuskokwim community of Aniak is preparing for two possible disasters at once.


Registered Nurse Avelina Chung runs through protocol with a YKHC employee at the COVID-19 drive-thru test site on March 25, 2020 in Bethel, Alaska.
Katie Basile / KYUK

The first person in Bethel to test positive for the coronavirus is self-isolating at home, and likely contracted the virus while traveling. 


An Alaska Airlines plane at Juneau International Airport on March 3, 2003.
Creative Commons photo by Gillfoto

Alaska Airlines says that it will keep flying to all the communities it currently serves. The company issued a news release stating this commitment after Ravn Air Group’s abrupt announcement that it would end all flights, lay off employees, and file for bankruptcy.

Katie Basile/KYUK

A positive case of COVID-19 has been confirmed for the first time in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. The Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation announced the region’s initial case in a press release on April 6, bringing the total number of cases in the state to 192.

A fleet of Cessna 207 airplanes owned by RavnAir sit grounded on the tarmac after the airline announced they were cutting 90 percent of their service on April 2, 2020.
Katie Basile / KYUK

When RavnAir suddenly discontinued service to rural communities across the state, it left workers without jobs and villages without passenger or mail service. Already, other regional airlines are stepping in to close the gaps Ravn left behind. Three airlines are expanding their routes in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, and some are even hiring.



Pages