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Health

Health related stories.

Katie Basile / KYUK

Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation President and CEO Dan Winkelman has issued an apology to YKHC customers for the recent incident involving partially sterilized dental instruments. Over a nine-day period from Sept 13 - 21, the dental clinic saw 191 patients and used partially sterilized instruments on up to 13 of them. The health corporation attempted to contact all 191 patients before notifying KYUK. They want the patients to test for Hepatitis B, C, and HIV even though the corporation says the risk of infection is so low that the CDC and State Epidemiology did not recommend testing. YKHC released Winkelman’s letter of apology Thursday night. KYUK talked with him shortly afterwards.


Charles Enoch / KYUK

Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation’s preventative services program Calricaraq is one of a chosen few to be honored at a national awards ceremony called Honoring Nations. 


Dean Swope / KYUK

The Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation is offering blood tests to patients treated at their dental clinic between Sept 13 - 21 after the clinic learned that some instruments were only partially sterilized.


Film Academy Students / LKSD

It's expensive to provide water and sewer in rural areas, especially in the Arctic. That's true not only in Alaska, but all around the globe. Providing safe water and affordable waste disposal was at the center of a conference hosted in Anchorage last week by the Arctic Council.


Dean Swope / KYUK

The Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation has begun expanding its hospital with an aim towards improving health care in the region. The project is expected to take five years and includes building a new primary care facility, renovating the current hospital, and adding housing for its increased staff.

Adrian Wagner / KYUK

Earlier this week a group gathered in Bethel to talk with the community on the region’s heroin and opioid epidemic. This group included the FBI, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, local and state law enforcement, and local health officials. They met with high school students during the day and the community in the evening. At both events, they screened a documentary on heroin and opioid addiction and then held a discussion on the issue where they answered questions from the crowd. KYUK broadcast the community event live from Bethel City Hall. Today on Delta Affairs Weekly, we’re airing segments from that broadcast. Some of these segments have been edited for length. We jump in part-way through the conversation.


Adrian Wagner / KYUK

Monday a group gathered in Bethel to talk with the community about the region’s heroin and opioid epidemic and what people can do about it. This group included the FBI, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, local and state law enforcement, and local health officials. They talked with students at the schools during the day and with the community in the evening. KYUK’s Adrian Wagner and Anna Rose MacArthur discuss why the group came and what happened while they were here.

Adrian Wagner / KYUK

Law enforcement and health officials are asking the community for help in stemming the tide of opioid and heroin addiction in Alaska.

Monday in Bethel, the Alaska U.S. Attorney’s Office, FBI, local law enforcement, and local health officials held a community forum on the issue at Bethel City Hall. The evening began with a screening of the documentary film Chasing the Dragon, which is produced by the FBI and DEA and focuses on heroin and opioid addiction. The screening was followed by a community discussion. The group held a similar event at Bethel schools that morning.

Alaska Holds Global Gathering On Sewer And Water Issues

Sep 19, 2016
Steve Johnson / Flickr Creative Commons

Experts from around the world are gathering in Anchorage Monday to talk about providing healthy water and sewer services in remote Arctic communities.

FBI

The Department of Justice has named this week National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week. It’s a week to educate the public on the effects of heroin and opioid abuse and give people information to help them stop the epidemic.

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