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Crime

Stories involving criminal activities.

The state of Alaska now has federal funds to advance a program to use tribal courts to handle misdemeanor crimes. Alaska Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth has been working with tribal courts to create a simple process for transferring cases, known as a civil diversion agreement, to enable tribal courts to handle low level crimes in a more culturally sensitive manner. But there has been a problem: Lindermuth says that the state and tribes need more resources to get the program rolling. 

Joseph Wilson, age 32, has been charged with two felonies and one misdemeanor for breaking into Bethel City Hall on October 5, 2018.
Courtesy of the Bethel Police Department

After searching for two days last week, Bethel police finally found the man they wanted at city hall.


Anna Rose MacArthur / KYUK

This time last year, there were eight Village Public Safety Officers across the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Now there are nine, and one more is undergoing a background check as part of the application process. The region contains 56 tribes, and many don’t have any law enforcement at all.


National Park Service

The Facebook post showed gallon-sized bags of moose ribs for $25 each and appeared on the private page "Bethel Bargains." Selling big game meat is illegal in Alaska, and the post's creator, Arnold Lupie, age 36, of Bethel, received a minor offense charge.


Just after midnight on September 19, State Troopers responded to the house of Ellenore and Ralph Kvamme, brother and sister, to find Ralph Kvamme, the brother, lying dead in a recliner with a stab wound in his chest.

Patrick Sergie.

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta has the highest rate of airport runway vandalism in the state, and the village of Kasigluk is the latest community to suffer from it. This time the consequences are severe: medevacs weren’t able to land in the village at night this week. 

Former VPO Anna Bill Interviews Commissioner Walt Monegan

Sep 17, 2018
Former Mountain Village Police Officers Anna Bill and Joseph Rivers discuss their work at the Mountain Village police station. On September 14, 2018, Bill interviewed Department of Public Safety Commissioner Walt Monegan about the state's support for rura
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

Last week, KYUK ran a four-part series on the experiences of Anna Bill, a former village police officer in Mountain Village who reluctantly quit her job after helping to save dozens of lives. While her community supported her, Anna still responded to calls without adequate equipment or reinforcements. So last Friday, she sat down with Department of Public Safety Commissioner Walt Monegan and asked him what the state could do support officers like her. This interview was moderated by KYUK's Teresa Cotsirilos and has been condensed for time.


Former Mountain Village Police Officers Anna Bill and Joseph Rivers enjoy a quiet moment between calls in June, 2018.
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

In June 2018, KYUK flew to Mountain Village to meet with former Village Police Officer Anna Bill. We followed Anna as she helped save her neighbors from suicide attempts, navigated a frustrating health care system, and coped with personal tragedies of her own. Like many Village and Tribal Police Officers, Anna performed a difficult job with no training, inadequate equipment, and little financial support. This series explores those challenges.

Former Mountain Village Police Officer Anna Bill and her son, Ramond Landlord.
Courtesy of Anna Bill.

Anna Bill became a cop in Mountain Village because she felt that God wanted her to help her neighbors.


Village Police Officers Anna Bill and Joseph Rivers chat between calls in Mountain Village.
Teresa Cotsirilos/KYUK

It's Friday night in Mountain Village, and Village Police Officer Anna Bill is trying to stay awake. "It’s only just starting," she says, then groans. "I'm on one hour of sleep."


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